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For nearly five decades CSWS has funded feminist scholarship at the University of Oregon. Our mission is simple: we create, fund, share, and support research that addresses the complicated nature of gender identities and inequalities.
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Annie Fukushima
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Create

Our faculty and student affiliates generate wide-ranging research on the complexity of women’s lives and the intersecting nature of gender identities and inequalities. Discover what we are working on.

Fund

For five decades, we have funded feminist scholarship at the University of Oregon. Read about our present opportunities and past awards

Share

As a research center, we disseminate new knowledge on the complicated nature of gender identities and inequalities with other scholars and educators, the public, policymakers, and activists. Keep in touch with the latest news, publications, and media.

Support

Through event programming and special initiatives, we foster networking, collaboration, and mentorship within our vibrant community of feminist scholars.  Learn more about how to get involved.

Feminist Futures: CSWS 50th Anniversary

During AY 2023-24, the Center for the Study of Women in Society will celebrate 50 years of enriching the University of Oregon community. Our year-long celebration will include invited speakers, exhibits, performances, and events that speak to intersectional feminist research and the ways in which gender, race, class, ability, and sexual orientation intersect and inform our visions of social justice. As the Center looks ahead to our next five decades, we will explore both the promises for and the imperilment of our “feminist futures” within fraught social, political, and environmental landscapes both nationally and globally. 
50 Years

History of CSWS

For more than 45 years CSWS has funded feminist scholarship at the University of Oregon. Our mission is simple: we create, fund, and share research that addresses the complicated nature of gender identities and inequalities.

Our ability to do this resulted from an incredible act of generosity. In 1983, the hard work and vision of faculty members working in what was then called the Center for the Sociological Study of Women attracted the attention of Fortune magazine editor William Harris. His endowment, the largest single gift ever given to the university at that time, was given in memory of his wife, Jane Grant, an early feminist and co-founder of The New Yorker.

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Upcoming Events

Queer Career: Sexuality and Work in Modern America at William W. Knight Law Center

Princeton historian Margot Canaday will discuss her book, Queer Career, which explores the experiences of sexual minorities in the American workforce during the second half of the twentieth century. Canaday shows how LGBT history helps us understand the recent history of capitalism and labor and rewrites our understanding of the queer past.

Livestreaming is available for this event.

4:30pm
William W. Knight Law Center, 110
“How to Cope with Climate Anxiety: Saving the Earth and Saving Ourselves” at Erb Memorial Union (EMU)

Britt Wray’s fascinating and hopeful talk demonstrates the emotional and existential effects of living in a warming world—and how we can get through them together. Although anxieties surrounding the climate crisis can cause us to burn out, give up, and question deeply personal decisions like whether to have children, working through these anxieties can unlock a deep capacity to care for and act on climate issues. We need to look at the climate crisis as a whole—not just the political or technological issues, but the mental health consequences as well.

5:30pm
Erb Memorial Union (EMU)
Natalia Molina lecture

Natalia Molina is a professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California. Her research explores the intertwined histories of race, place, gender, culture, and citizenship. She is the author of How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts (UC Press, 2014) and Fit to Be Citizens?: Public Health and Race in Los Angeles, 1879–1940 (UC Press, 2006).

7:00pm

News

Jan 30, 2023

Research Matters looks at Antonina Raisanovsky's The Family

In the winter issue of Research Matters, Jenifer Presto, associate professor of comparative literature, shares the extraordinary story of Antonina Riasanovsky, author of best-selling 1940 novel The Family. Antonina, her husband, and their two young sons immigrated from China to Eugene during the Second World War.

Jan 27, 2023

Tannaz Farsi wins 2022 Presidential Fellowship

From Around the O—CSWS advisory board member Tannaz Farsi, Department of Art in the College of Design, is one of two recipients of the 2022 Presidential Fellowship in Arts and Humanities. Chosen from a pool of 50 applicants, the winners were recognized for their outstanding scholarly and creative records, respectively, as well as specific works in progress. Recipients will receive a $25,000 award to support their creative and scholarly work.

Jan 27, 2023

Margot Canaday to discuss sexual minorities and work Feb. 16

On February 16, Princeton historian Margot Canaday will discuss her book, Queer Career, which explores the experiences of sexual minorities in the American workforce during the second half of the twentieth century. Canaday shows how LGBT history helps us understand the recent history of capitalism and labor and rewrites our understanding of the queer past. The talk will be held 4:30–6 p.m. in the Knight Law Center, room 110, 1515 Agate St., Eugene. The event also will be livestreamed.