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Le Guin Feminist Science Fiction Fellowship: An Interview with 2014 Fellow Kathryn Allan

Kathryn Allan (l) chats with Jenée Wilde, then CSWS development GTF, at the CSWS 40th Anniversary Celebration in Nov. 2013 / photo by Jack Liu.

Kathryn Allan (l) chats with Jenée Wilde, then-CSWS development GTF, at the CSWS 40th Anniversary Celebration in Nov. 2013 / photo by Jack Liu.

Editor’s Note: The deadline for the 2014-15 Le Guin Feminist Science Fiction Fellowship is September 5, 2014. This interview appears in the 2014 CSWS Annual Review.

“‘The Other Lives’—Locating Dis/Ability in Utopian Feminist Science Fiction”

CSWS interviewed Kathryn Allan, inaugural winner of the Le Guin Feminist Science Fiction Fellowship, during her CSWS-supported visit to do research at the UO Libraries Special Collections and University Archives. Allan immersed herself in the archives, reading the letters of Ursula K. Le Guin, Joanna Russ, and other feminist science fiction authors, seeking out conversations about disability and utopia, and delighting in her discoveries.

Q: How does it feel to be selected as the first winner of the Le Guin Feminist Science Fiction Fellowship?

KA: It is the best honor I’ve had in my academic career by far. Having left academia after I finished my degree in 2010, I didn’t really think that I’d have the same kind of opportunities to keep going with my research. But if I did, it was going to be out of pocket, which wasn’t going to happen for a long time. The fact that the committee chose someone who identifies as an independent scholar was astounding to me.

Q: You’re doing research in UO Special Collections and University Archives. What materials are you exploring? How do you know where to look?

KA: I’m going through Ursula K. Le Guin’s papers at my beginning. continue reading….

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Deadline Sept. 5 for 2014-15 Le Guin Feminist Science Fiction Fellowship

September 5, 2014
5:00 pm

2014_Le_Guin_Fellowship_flyerDeadline
Le Guin Fellowship Flyer PDF

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Women in Society, Robert D. Clark Honors College, and University of Oregon Libraries Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA).

Purpose: The intention of the Le Guin Feminist Science Fiction Fellowship is to encourage research within collections in the area of feminist science fiction. The UO Libraries Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) houses the papers of authors Ursula K. Le Guin, Joanna Russ, Kate Wilhelm, Suzette Haden Elgin, Sally Miller Gearhart, Kate Elliot, Molly Gloss, Laurie Marks, and Jessica Salmonson, along with Damon Knight. SCUA is also in the process of acquiring the papers of James Tiptree, Jr. and other key feminist science fiction authors. For more about these collections, visit http://library.uoregon.edu/node/3524. continue reading….

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Archivist Jennifer O’Neal receives national diversity award

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CSWS Facebook Page

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Be sure to follow the UO Center for the Study of Women in Society on Facebook. We’re at UOCSWS.

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Fembot’s August 2014 Books Aren’t Dead Interview: Monster Culture in the 21st Century

Monster_Culture_bookcoverFembot’s Books Aren’t Dead (BAD) interview for August 2014 is now uploaded on the Fembot website. In this month’s interview Mark McCarthy (doctoral candidate at University of South Florida) talks with Marina Levina (assistant professor, University of Memphis) and Diem-My Bui (clinical assistant professor, University of Illinois-Chicago), editors of Monster Culture in the 21st Century: A Reader (Bloomsbury Academic, 2013). You can listen to this interview at: http://fembotcollective.org/blog/2014/08/01/books-arent-dead-monster-culture-in-the-21st-century-a-reader/ continue reading….

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Sexual assault review panel to begin work this week | Around the O

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UO’s Madonna Moss cited prominently as herring return to Alaskan Bay

Madonna Moss processing herring eggs with Sitka Tribe of Alaska.

Madonna Moss processing herring eggs with Sitka Tribe of Alaska.

Moss cited prominently as herring return to Alaskan Bay | Around the O.

July 15, 2014—“Herring returned to Auke Bay near Juneau, Alaska, last month, later than usual, and they’ve laid eggs for the first time in decades, but people in the region, as well as UO anthropologist Madonna Moss,are wondering whether eggs from the fish will survive their spawning in warm temperatures.

”Moss recently co-authored a research paper that looked at data on herring populations over the last 2,500 years and beyond at numerous sites in the Pacific Northwest, from near Seattle to Alaska. Pacific herring have been a foundation for coastal ecosystems and an important food source for indigenous populations….” Read the entire story, written by Jim Barlow (UO Public Affiars Communications): Moss cited prominently as herring return to Alaskan Bay | Around the O.  Madonna Moss is a CSWS faculty affiliate.