“To Gain Title to Our Bodies: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance in the Civil Rights Era,” a lecture by Danielle McGuire

McGuireflyer_WEB 375 McKenzie Hall
1101 Kincaid St.
UO campus
Free public lecture

Danielle McGuire argues that Black women’s protests against sexual assault and interracial rape fueled the modern civil rights movement and that even the most well-known movement campaigns — the 1955-56 Montgomery bus boycott, the 1964 Freedom Summer, and the 1965 Selma March — are rooted in the struggle for bodily integrity and the defense of Black womanhood.

Danielle McGuire, Wayne State University, is the author of: At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance—a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power (Knopf, 2010) and Freedom Rights: New Perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement (University Press of Kentucky, 2011).

A FREE PUBLIC LECTURE SPONSORED BY UO HISTORY DEPARTMENT AND NORMAN H. BROWN JR FACULTY FELLOW FUND

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